A Brief History of Texas

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Texans love their heritage, to the point that many of them associate first with being Texans and then with being Americans. I have to admit, this type of “I’m proud of where I come from” cowboy attitude always struck me as petty and meaningless, whether you’re from TX or NY, but for a state that is so closely associated with being good Christian patriots, I find this incredibly interesting. Even a bit endearing to the good people of Texas.

A great example of this is an urban legend that claims that Texas’ constitution states that they can fly their flag higher than the flag of the USA. It’s just an urban legend, and really, who is to stop someone from flying flags any damn way they please, but it shows a sense of the Texan pride. “We love America, don’t get us wrong, but if it comes down to it, we’ve got Texan in our blood first.”

The word Texas itself is of American Indian origin, and means “friend” or “allies”.

Another interesting fact is the origin of the Six Flags. You may recognize the name from the amusement park, but it actually refers to the Six Flags over Texas, one for each country that Texas has been ruled by. First there was Spain, who claimed the area for some 300 years, mostly doing nothing with it. France came along somewhere there in the middle and accidentally set up a colony at the mouth of the Colorado River (not the big one, Texas has it’s own Colorado River, which never actually goes through Colorado) instead of at the mouth of the Mississippi (a mere 400 miles away). After Mexico declared it’s independence, Texas found itself under the Mexican flag for about 14 years, until the Mexican government moved towards a more centralized form than a federalist. Don’t mess with Texas freedom, Mexico. So they declared independence and were the Republic of Texas for 9 years before being willingly annexed to the United States. Big fans of slavery, Texas joined the Confederacy just long enough to get their asses kicked along with the other southern states.

I love Texas, I really do.